About Card Lock

Card Lock is an “As Seen on TV” sleeve that claims to feature frequency-blocking properties to prevent criminals from using “skimmers” to steal your credit card information in seconds, and even your identity, just by walking by.

In order to accomplish this, Card Lock sleeves are claimed to feature special high-tech polymers woven directly into their threads, which work “like an armored car” and make it virtually impossible for anyone to steal your information, including your name, address, social security information, and more.

Card Lock is claimed to be lightweight and soft, yet strong and secure, and to come is stylish leather or fun paisley patterns. In order to use Card Lock, the manufacturer claims that you simply slide your credit card into the ultra-thin sleeve, and put it back in your wallet.

Credit cards can be replaced, but the immense amount of time and effort it takes to recover from ID fraud can’t. And when it comes down to it, you have much more important things to focus on, like your loved ones. So, can Card Lock really help prevent credit card theft and ID fraud? Let’s break down the facts.

Can Criminals Really Use RFID Scanners to Steal Your Credit Card Data?

Have you ever been behind someone in line at a checkout, and watched them pay by waiving their credit card over a big chunk of plastic at the register? If so, this is known as a contactless payment system, which Wikipedia defines as, “credit cards and debit cards, key fobs, smartcards or other devices that use radio-frequency identification for making secure payments. The embedded chip and antenna enable consumers to wave their card or fob over a reader at the point of sale.”

Because contactless cards transmit a small radio frequency when in close proximity with a payment device that emits the proper signal, this signal can intercepted by a criminal. How? According to a Consumer Reports video, all criminals have to do is place a card reader (essentially the same one you’d find near a cash register, although they’re often hand-built) in a bag, bring their bag within close proximity (often by “accidentally” bumping into you), at which point their card reader will automatically obtain information from any of your RF-enabled cards. Then, they take this information, upload it into a computer, and produce counterfeit cards.

As such, RFID blocking sleeves like Card Lock will only protect the contactless cards you carry, not standard credit cards.

Can Card Lock’s “Frequency-Blocking” Polymers Protect You from these Thieves?

Before we discern whether or not Card Lock can help protect you, let’s first look at the polymers contained in the sleeve.

What Is a Polymer?

Without getting too science-y, polymers are basically just strings of molecules that can behave differently and display a variety of characteristics depending on the molecules they’re made of, as well as the way in which they’re put together. If you’re looking for a more in-depth explanation about polymers, the Polymer Science Learning Center provides a great explanation for the non-scientists among us.

What Polymer Is Card Lock Made Of?

As you can see, saying that a product is made of a polymer doesn’t provide much in the way of explaining what the exact polymer is. And unfortunately, the Card Lock website doesn’t provide any additional information in this respect either.

Because of this, it’s impossible to say whether or not the polymers contained in Card Lock can prevent your information from being stolen.

What Do Faraday Cages Have to Do with Card Lock?

However, according to MakeUseOf.com, “The most effective RFID-protecting sleeves, pouches and wallets on the market are those that use a Faraday Cage within a leather exterior. Faraday cages in paper sleeves are also very effective, but will be less durable. Search for protection that contains the words “Electromagnetically Opaque” and you should be on the right track.”

So what is a Faraday cage? Wikipedia claims it’s an “enclosure formed by conductive material or by a mesh of such material. Such an enclosure blocks external static and non-static electric fields by channeling electricity through the mesh, providing constant voltage on all sides of the enclosure. Since the difference in voltage is the measure of electrical potential, no current flows through the space.”

Ultimately, we’re telling you all of this not just to make you a more informed consumer, but also to outline some of the essential information missing on the Card Lock website. As such, without knowing what polymers or other materials Card Lock is constructed of, or whether these materials create a Faraday cage, it’s impossible to say whether or not it works as advertised.

Card Lock Isn’t Your Only Choice

If you try typing in “RFID blocking sleeves” into your favorite search engine, you’ll get dozens of results. In fact, there are a wide variety of companies who also make RFID blocking wallets, although these will admittedly cost more than Card Lock.

But if you’re looking for the ultimate in low-cost RFID blocking, the Consumer Reports article noted above also claims, “One security expert suggests wrapping cards in aluminum foil as a cheaper, effective alternative to RFID-blocking wallets or sleeves.”

Do You Even Need Card Lock in the First Place?

According to a June 2014 Yahoo Finance article, credit card companies are attempting to address this problem by equipping their cards with increasingly secure microchips, although these are more targeted toward preventing fraud during “swiping” transactions, where a computerized terminal reads your card’s magnetic strip.

However, as we can see, these chips cause a security concern of their own, which involves the use of RFID readers, which are far from fool-proof. The Yahoo article noted above goes on to say, “After the Target breach last year security journalist Brian Krebs told NPR the chip cards "simply raises the costs for the bad guys...It's not that they can't break the system — but it makes it more expensive for them to fabricate these cards."

Are Consumers Pleased with Card Lock?

Card Lock is a very new product, and didn’t have any online customer reviews available at the time of our research.

However, Card Lock is manufactured by TeleBrands based out of Fairfield, NJ, a massive player within the “As Seen on TV” industry, who also makes Ankle Genie, Pocket Hose Ultra, Grassology, and many other popular products.

Among hundreds of HighYa reviews for these products though, the average star rating is 1.5, with some of the most common complaints citing poor quality products that don’t work as advertised, difficulty obtaining refunds, and poor customer service (rude, unable to help, numerous upsells during calls, etc.).

Card Lock Pricing & Refund Policy

A set of 4 card locks in your choice of solid or paisley is priced at $10, plus free S&H.

Card Lock comes with a 30-day refund policy, less S&H charges. In order to initiate the process, you’ll need to contact customer service at 855-668-1655.

Bottom Line

While polymer-based sleeves have been used successfully to protect identity and credit card information for years, there simply isn’t enough information provided on the Card Lock website to say whether or not this specific product will work as advertised, or if it’s worth your money.

With this in mind, you may want to purchase an RFID blocking sleeve from a local retailer (which will make the return process easier if you’re dissatisfied), or from an online retailer who provides detailed information about their product.

Tired of Rip-Offs on TV? Want to Learn to Shop Smarter?

Join over 2 million HighYa readers who receive weekly how-to guides, tips & reviews and get a FREE COPY of our 145 Scam Hacks e-book. Enter your email below to get started!

11 Customer Reviews for Card Lock

Average Customer Rating: 1.4
Rating Snapshot:
5 stars: 0 4 stars: 0 3 stars: 2 2 stars: 0 1 stars: 9
Bottom Line: 18% would recommend it to a friend
Showing 1-11 of 11
Sort reviews by:

  • Painful experience

    I bought from the clearance aisle for $5. I put my cards in my back pocket. Later in the day, I felt a real bad burning sensation. When I looked, I found a burn mark on my skin. Two months later I still have a mark. I don't know if it was my sweat that activated this polymer or just a reaction from the polymer itself.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 4 out 5 people found this review helpful

    Good

    I purchased Card Lock at a store. The wallets are thin, light and durable. I work for the government and use a CAC card on a reader to enter my office. The CAC card does not work on the reader while in the wallet. The wallet blocks the use. The CAC card works wonderfully outside the wallet. So the wallet does block the transmission of something. Overall Card Lock does offer what they promise.

    Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 29 out 30 people found this review helpful

    The advertisement claim is a lie

    • Dallas, TX,
    • Feb 10, 2016

    The TV advertisement says that most chip enabled cards, RFID, radiate a signal that can be read by nearby hackers. This is absolutely UNTRUE. The new EMV chips used by Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and other major banks AND credit unions DO NOT use a type of chip that can be intercepted by hackers. This is a FALSE claim to encourage people to buy their product. The people that sell this product are LIARS, call your bank or credit card company and ask. Who are you going to trust with your money, your bank, or these sales criminals that want to steal your money and lie to you?

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (1)
    View all 1 commentsHide comments
    • Feb 23, 2016

      TechGuru

      Yep! LockWallet is a total scam of lies! Very very few cards offer RFID (AKA MasterCard PayPass and Visa PayWave). EVM Chip's are SmartChips like DirecTV access cards use and do not use RF of any kind.

      Nearly no banks these days offer PayPass/PayWave RFID on Debit cards any more and very few offer it on credit cards. RFID payments are generally limited to $200 per day.

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 32 out 35 people found this review helpful

    Real Bad Customer Service

    When I ordered this I saw on the confirmation that they had charged me $49.98. The bill was only suppose to be $21.00. I called and the customer service rep told me it would be corrected before they charged my credit card. Well they didn't and I called two more times. Then they said the wallets had been shipped just to return them, (which I did by signed receipt). I got an email saying they were refunding my full amount. Well they only gave me $35.00. Not the $49.98 they had mistakenly charged me. So I called back and the young lady told me that they would return the $14.98 they still owed by the next day. Today is the next day (12/4/2015), I still have not seen the remaining money they owed me.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 40 out 41 people found this review helpful

    Check with your credit card company first

    • Nov 1, 2015

    If you will check with your credit card company you will find that the new chip cards no longer contain any RFID chips at all and can not be scanned. They make an encrypted connection to the terminal and to the card before exchanging data, which is impossible for the scammers to do.

    This is a waste of money because cards no longer contain RFID chips.

    What does is your iPhone payment system.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 21 out 24 people found this review helpful

    RFID?

    • Robertsdale, Alabama,
    • Oct 29, 2015

    Lock wallet only protects what is inside it so yes it does what it says. My problem is that it boasts things that it cannot do like protecting the RFID chip which by the way does not broadcast a thing. NFC, Near Field Communication, is what they are talking about. The new embedded chip that is on your new debit or credit card requires contact by slipping the card into a slot, it has nothing to do with NFC or RFID. Don't let these companies play on your fears or worries about identity theft. Your new credit cards are already protected by requiring gold pin contact in a slot belonging to a machine that is dedicated for that purpose. As of October 1st, POS (which stands for point of sale) had to be upgraded so merchants could rest easy knowing that identity theft and credit card fraud would be minimized by using this new technology. Bottom line is merchants are responsible 4 charge-backs and/or fraud if they continue to use the old readers and points of sale. So now you know the truth.

    Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 26 out 33 people found this review helpful

    This sucks

    • California,
    • Sep 24, 2015

    I think this product is junk and is useless.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 36 out 37 people found this review helpful

    Don't Do Business With Them!

    • Bellingham, WA,
    • Sep 15, 2015

    I made the mistake of ordering their product thinking I was being prudent. When I started doing some investigating about them (which admittedly I should have done to begin with), I realized this was a lousy company to do business with. I contacted customer service and had my order canceled, or so I thought.

    Months later I received an e-mail saying that the item was shipped and I discovered that they charged me anyway. I called the company and told them that this was canceled and refunded months ago. The person at the other end continually said “please bear with me” and told me my money would be refunded in 3-5 days. So, we'll see if I get my money refunded or not.

    After this I'm calling my bank and getting a new debit card. I don't trust this company AT ALL.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 66 out 68 people found this review helpful

    Complete fraud

    • Cliff, NM,
    • Aug 9, 2015

    It was not solid leather. It was just thin aluminum foil. It was complete fraud.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (1)
    View all 1 commentsHide comments
    • Aug 10, 2015

      DoctorWho

      If you want to shield your credit cards, get an old fashioned cigarette case, lots of room for many cards, and the good ones have a clasp to keep it closed, make sure a magnet will stick to the case, for maximum protection you want a case made of a ferrous metal, iron alloy, mild steel.

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 93 out 95 people found this review helpful

    Unhappy

    • Texas,
    • Jul 25, 2015

    I'm not reviewing the product but the service. They charged my credit card twice! I called them and they said the first charge of $19.99 was a pre-authorization charge. Usually a pre-authorization charge is $1.00! They said my order shipped today so my card was charged the same day and the pre-authorization charge would show back up as a refund on my card. HA! I canceled the card when I saw the unauthorized charge made on it today. So, now I'll never get my money back. If you order from them, do it with a prepaid card and immediately use the balance up and get rid of the card or like me, you will be charged again.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (2)
    View all 2 commentsHide comments
    • Aug 25, 2015

      ShadowFalls

      Everyone BEWARE! Even if these things worked like they claimed, they would only apply to RFID cards. Credit cards are transitioning to use EMV chips and these RFID ones will not be around anymore. So anyone even thinking about buying this assuming they theoretically work, will be buying something that will be useless in the near future.

      The "Skimming" they refer to is actually when they take your card and "Swipe" it through a card skimmer. The RFID chip in some cards, which are very few as it is, can be run through remotely, but almost no one bothers since so few people have them either way.

      So in short, Google EMV credit cards and you will see how this thing isn't relevant anymore.

    • Feb 9, 2016

      Allen McCready

      Simply dispute the charge with your credit card company. Chase Bank does a good, and fair job resolving these types of problems for their cardholders..

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


  • 113 out 116 people found this review helpful

    Card Lock Scam

    • Georgia,
    • Jul 21, 2015

    The Card Lock is made out of paper with aluminum foil inside and has stamped leather looking ink on the paper. It may has 15 cents worth of material, if that. Buyer beware!

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)


Showing 1-11 of 11

Write a review for Card Lock!

Share your experience to help others avoid scams & discover great products!

Write a Review