About Gigwalk

Founded in 2010 and based out of San Francisco, CA, Gigwalk is a mobile app that helps you earn money by completing “gigs,” which are posted by businesses that need very specific services. For example, you may be required to take a picture of a product only available at a certain store, or you may need to visit a local restaurant and provide detailed feedback regarding the food, service, etc.

Gigwalk has been featured on CNN, CNET, and Forbes, and claims to be used by companies such as Ebay, Red Bull, Nokia, Chartis, and many more. The company is not listed with the Better Business Bureau, and online reviews appear to be mixed. Based on our research, the most common complaints include failing to get paid, poor customer service, and very low pay.

How Gigwalk Works

According to the Gigwalk website, the company was “founded with the goal of reinventing work in a mobile world,” and that their app—available for Android and iOS—has been downloaded more than 400,000 times, and has been used to complete more than 1.2 million gigs. With this in mind, there are two ways to use the company’s services: As an individual (known as a “Gigwalker”) or as a business, which we’ll discuss below.

Gigwalk for Individuals

As an individual (aka Gigwalker), you can apply for jobs—known as “gigs” – that need to be completed in your area. Anyone can complete a gig, as long as their skillset matches the employer’s needs, and are at least 16 years old and based in the U.S.

In order to start using Gigwalk as an individual, you’ll first need to download the app, sign up for an account, and then fill out your profile (e.g. name, date of birth, education level, skillset, etc.). Finally, you’ll also need to enter your PayPal information so that you can accept payment after a gig has been successfully completed.

Once your account has been set up, you can begin looking for gigs. To accomplish this, you’ll search a Google map of your area, which includes red pins that signify a gig needs completion. By clicking on an individual pin, you can see the gig’s details, which will include instructions like, “Take a picture of the menu,” or, “Verify the parking situation,” as well as the price the client is willing to pay. If you’d prefer, you can also view gigs in list, by-pay, and by-task formats.

To begin working the gig, you’ll first need to be within a certain distance of its location. In other words, unless you’re physically present, you can’t live in San Francisco and apply for gigs in Los Angeles. Once you locate a gig from the map or list view, click on it in order to view information about what needs to be completed. If you’re ready to begin, just tap the green “Start Working” button, and full instructions will appear. Keep in mind that you may need to download some third-party apps (such as PhotoSynth) to finish all of a specific gig’s tasks. After you’ve completed everything required, simply upload any relevant files (e.g. images), and press the “Submit Work” button.

Once the business approves your work, your PayPal account will be credited within seven days, less any associated fees. At this point, the employer will also be given the opportunity to award you with “streetcred,” which signifies that you’ve done a good job. Once you accumulate enough streetcred points, higher-paying/higher quality gigs will become available.

So to break it down, the Gigwalk process for individuals entails six main steps:

  1. A business posts a gig for work needed.
  2. You search the database for a gig that meets your needs, and submit your application.
  3. If your background matches the business’s needs, they hire you.
  4. You complete the required work, and upload it to your customer via the Gigwalk app.
  5. Your work is either approved, or may require a quick follow up.
  6. Once the assignment is complete, you’ll be paid through PayPal.

Gigwalk for Businesses:

If you’re a business owner, you simply have to post a gig through the Gigwalk website, and wait for a Gigwalker to accept and complete the job.

In addition, the company appears to provide a suite of services that can help you automate your business’s merchandising, and improve your shelf compliance. For instance, their Shelfwatch product helps you “track and fix retail execution,” while their Eventwatch product helps make sure you in-store marketing events go off without a hitch. Overall, in addition to the services provided by their app, Gigwalk is focused on giving you real time data that you can use to gain huge insights into how your business operates, and how you can improve these processes to boost your ROI.

With this in mind, the overall process can be complex, so for additional information, as well as a product demo, please click here.

Gigwalk Pricing

For individuals, downloading the Gigwalk app is completely free of charge, though you’ll be responsible for covering PayPal fees after you’ve been paid for a gig. On the other hand, employers will pay a 50% fee for every gig they post. In other words, this means that if you post a $10 gig, you’ll be charged an additional $5 by Gigwalk.

Bottom Line: Is Gigwalk a Scam?

Based on our research, Gigwalk gives every appearance of a legitimate company that provides a legitimate service. However, if you’re thinking about signing up for Gigwalk, there are a few things you’ll need to keep in mind.

First and foremost, the pay is often very low, and the amount you’ll earn on a per-hour basis can be affected by any number of factors, including the total number of tasks to complete, whether or not you’ll ultimately be allowed to perform a task (for example, taking product pictures in a grocery store), how far you have to travel, and much more. With most gigs ranging between $5 and $20 (and some going as low as $2.50 and as high as $50), even if everything goes smoothly, the reality is that you’ll probably only earn $50-$60 per day on a full time basis. So if you’re planning to get rich from Gigwalk, you may want to reconsider.

Next, there have been numerous complaints about individuals experiencing difficulty getting paid, and of poor customer service. In addition, frustration with the overall process appears to be predominant, and includes claims that individuals were kicked off gigs after completing all the required tasks, with little to no explanation. This appears to be especially prevalent for those who haven’t acquired much streetcred.

So, is Gigwalk a scam? Definitely not. But if you approach the service with the knowledge that you’re likely not going to earn a lot of money, and are likely to experience some frustration—especially as a new user—you’ll be much more likely to have a positive experience. 

5 Customer Reviews for Gigwalk

Average Customer Rating: 3.0
Rating Snapshot:
5 stars: 2 4 stars: 0 3 stars: 0 2 stars: 1 1 stars: 2
Bottom Line: 40% would recommend it to a friend
Showing 1-5 of 5
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  • Gigwalk is a Scam

    • by Jeremy,
    • Santa Barbara CA,
    • Feb 11, 2015

    Gigwalk is notorious for refusing to pay people. There are hundreds of stories all over the web of people who submitted their gigs and had them rejected. Myself included. I did a gig and provided the images exactly as was requested. However after they were submitted the client changed their mind and wanted more detailed pictures. The client only gave me 24 hours to submit about 150 more images and was very vague in their instructions. I asked the client directly for more time and was granted an extra 24 hours. However, despite this, Gigwalk cancelled my gigs (keep in mind these were completed) and refused to pay me. I tried to contact them, but they do not give gig walkers a phone number to reach customer service. You can only use the email on their website. They didn't get back to me for two days then shuffled me around to other departments. The result is I worked 6 hours for Gigwalk and was supposed to be paid $60 and I got nothing. This same thing happened to a bunch of other gig walkers on the similar gigs. We are currently pursuing a class action lawsuit against the company. If you have been screwed by gig walk please contact us.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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  • 8 out 10 people found this review helpful

    Gigwalking

    • by David,
    • Ashtabula, Ohio,
    • Mar 10, 2014

    As a merchandiser I find Gigwalk a great way to earn a few more dollars when I'm in the store anyway. I only accept gigs that are close to me and can tie in with my merchandising schedule. I have always been paid for the completed gigs and would definitely recommend but only to compliment other jobs you may be doing.

    Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

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  • 0 out 3 people found this review helpful

    gigwalking

    • by David,
    • Ashtabula, Ohio,
    • Mar 4, 2014

    As a merchandiser I find gigwalk a great way to earn a few more dollars when I'm in the store anyway. I only accept gigs that are close to me and can tie in with my merchandising schedule. I have always been paid for the completed gigs and would definitely recommend but only to compliment other jobs you may be doing.

    Bottom Line: Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

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  • 12 out 13 people found this review helpful

    Frustrated With Gigwalk

    • by Bob Jones,
    • Atlanta,
    • Feb 28, 2014

    Gigwalk is fun to do but I must say I am disappointed in the lack of attention the Bing reviewers take when looking at submitted gigs. I have been "hoofing it" in a big city and ran into a lot of businesses closed or changed. I submitted thorough proof that is more proof than the asked for, and can tell by their comments that they did not even look at it. They ask for proof of closed businesses by showing they are boarded up. In one particular case, I submitted pics that shows the street number along with the whole front of the building boarded up.

    Obvious the location is closed and being renovated. The comment I got back was "We cannot approve this gig as the proof you have submitted is not sufficient". I have submitted gigs that were previously refused but after further explanation,have been approved. I had to point out what to look for in the pics to get them approved. I even supplied photosynths for closed businesses that had no addresses on the outside of the building trying to make sure I supplied sufficient proof. I would get back some crazy message like "please submit internal pictures" which has nothing to do with submitting a closed gig.

    Overall it was fun doing Gigwalk but not very monetarily rewarding due to lack of attention by Bing of what I submitted. I have done over 80 gigs in 2 weeks and so far have only been approved for 25. 16 were refused and the others are hovering in outer space some where. I did get to meet some interesting people as well as find some new restaurants. Lastly, getting paid is frustrating due to time lag in transfer from Paypal to checking account. Not anyone's fault, it's just the way it is.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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  • 14 out 15 people found this review helpful

    gigwalk is a scam

    • by Paul Corbin,
    • NY,
    • Feb 13, 2014

    The way this works is you go out and perform work they ask you to do. If they don't like how you did it...even tho you followed the instructions exactly they will make up different requests for you to go back. So basically they already got the Job done when you went out and then made up reasons to not have to pay you. That's why they add things after you complete it.

    You did the work and now they don't pay you because of some reason they made up. Bottom line ...you always do the work first.....this way they don't have to pay. Very easy for them to make up a reason you didn't do the job right.

    This equals no pay......stay far away.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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    • Feb 28, 2014

      Bob

      Not sure Bing intentionally disapproves gigs, I think they are just lazy and don't take time to review what is submitted. For closed businesses, I sent additional info including photosynths to prove I was there and business is truly closed or now a new business. Very frustrating!

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