About HeartGreens

By Derek Lakin
HighYa Staff Published on: May 27, 2017

Using a combination of premium greens like kale and spinach, HeartGreens is a powdered, lemon-flavored dietary supplement that promises to deliver dietary nitrates that can support healthy blood pressure and energy levels, circulation, and cardiovascular health.

Compared to the competition, the manufacturer tells us the supplement is the first and only one formulated to support healthy blood pressure and deliver functional benefits of greens. How? By providing the dietary nitrate equivalent of five servings of vegetables in each scoop.

Also, the site informs us that all of their greens undergo standardized testing to “ensure a consistent level of dietary nitrate to support nitric oxide production.”

Human Power of N tells us you only need to mix one (5g) scoop of HeartGreens with 4-6 ounces of water once per day for general use. Or, they claim you can double this amount (two scoops; 10g) for optimal blood pressure support.

After browsing through the HeartGreens website, you’re looking for answers to the following questions, so that you can make a more empowered purchase: 1) Does consuming leafy greens boost nitric oxide production, and 2) if so, does this boosted production result in any meaningful health benefits?

Let’s start with some basics.

What Are the Benefits of Dietary Nitrates & Nitric Oxide?

Nitrates are molecules consisting of one nitrogen atom bonded to three oxygen atoms. They’re commonly found in groundwater, but are also concentrated in fruits like strawberries, raspberries, and cherries.

As mentioned on the HeartGreens website, they’re also commonly found in leafy greens like lettuce, spinach, celery, carrots, and collard greens.

Once processed by the body, nitrates lose one of their oxygen atoms, which transforms into nitrites. Then, one of two things happens: These nitrites can become nitric oxide, a chemical that’s naturally released by specialized cells in the arteries to help widen blood vessels and improve circulation.

In fact, this is why doctors will often prescribe nitrate medications to patients suffering from heart disease and other circulation-related issues. Sounds good, right?

On the other hand, nitrites can also become nitrosamines, which are carcinogenic (they cause cancer). This is why many health professionals recommend that we avoid consuming an excessive amount of processed meats in our diet, which often have added nitrates that work as preservatives.

In fact, according to Cornell’s Natural Resources Cooperative Extension, “Meat products account for less than 10 percent of nitrate in the diet, but 60 to 90 percent of the nitrite consumed. This is primarily because of sodium nitrite added to foods such as hot dogs, bacon, or ham.”

With this in mind, are the ingredients found in HeartGreens a healthy source of nitrates?

HeartGreens’ Ingredients & Nutritional Information

Here’s what we’re told, according to the nutrition facts label listed on the HeartGreens website:

  • Calories 18
  • Total Fat 0g
  • Cholesterol 0g
  • Sodium 19mg
  • Potassium 140mg
  • Total Carbohydrates 3g
    • Dietary Fiber 1g
    • Sugars 1g
  • Protein 1g
  • Vitamin A 42% RDA
  • Vitamin C 106% RDA
  • Calcium 3% RDA
  • Folate 6% RDA

Ingredients: Kale, wheat grass, barley grass, spinach, inulin, natural lemon flavor, magnesium ascorbate, monk fruit extract, malic acid, stevia, spirulina, guar gum, licorice root extract

At just 18 calories, no fat or cholesterol, and very little sodium or carbohydrates, HeartGreens certainly doesn’t appear to be an unhealthy drink (we didn’t test it ourselves). Although unsurprisingly, as a vegetable-based drink, it doesn’t appear to contain much protein.

Vitamins A and C, calcium, and folate are essential for our health, although we’ve learned—based on our research and speaking with professionals—that they don’t provide a lot of meaningful benefits unless you’re deficient. Which most people aren’t, since much of the food supply is fortified with vitamins.

What about the specific vegetables found in each scoop of HeartGreens?

According to authoritative sites like the Natural Medicines Database and WebMD, barley has some evidence indicating it may help lower cholesterol between 14 and 20 percent, as well as blood pressure. Inulin may also help reduce triglycerides (which can clog arteries) and relieve constipation.

Outside of this, these sites didn’t report substantial evidence to support other health benefits as promoted by the manufacturer.

Could HeartGreens Cause Any Side Effects?

According to the Cornell article above, “Eighty to 90 percent of the nitrate most people consume comes from vegetables, but this is unlikely to cause health problems because very little of the nitrate in vegetables is converted to nitrite.”

As a result, outside of potential, temporary digestive upset, these sites report you’re unlikely to experience any substantial side effects when using HeartGreens as directed.

How Much Does HeartGreens Cost?

Human Power of N has priced HeartGreens as follows:

  • 1 Bottle (30 servings): $49.95 (save $5 with Replenishment Program)
  • 3 Bottles: $99.90 (save $10 with Replenishment Program)
  • 6 Bottles: $189.81

The single bottle option will come with an additional $8.95 S&H, while the other two options include free shipping.

If you choose the Replenishment option, you’ll be shipped a new supply of HeartGreens once every 30 or 90 days, and your credit card on file will be charged accordingly.

All purchases come with a 90-day refund policy, less S&H. In order to request one, or to make changes to your Replenishment Program subscription, customer service can be reached at 855-636-4040.

Are There Online Customer Reviews For HeartGreens?

We only encountered three online customer reviews for HeartGreens, all of which were on Amazon, where the supplement had an average rating of 3.5 stars. Two reviewers complimented its taste and ease of use, while the third complained of heartburn.

From a company perspective, Human Power of N is based out of Austin, TX and manufactures several other nitric oxide-focused powdered supplements like SuperBeets, Neo40, and BeetElite.

Of these, SuperBeets had the most HighYa reader reviews, with an average rating of four stars, based on 19 customer reviews. Most complimented its health benefits (everything from angina to blood pressure).

Obviously, we only include this information to help provide a clearer overall picture of the situation, not to insinuate you'll experience any of the same with HeartGreens, or any of the company’s other products.

Will you find similarly positive feedback for the competition?

Is HeartGreens the First & Only Greens Product Focused on Healthy Blood Pressure?

Far from it. In fact, searching online for “green powder” or “vegetable powder,” you’ll be met with hundreds of relevant results, many of which contain similar veggies and nutritional content as found in HeartGreens, while claiming to deliver many of the same health benefits.

However, we didn’t encounter any powdered products with the exact same formulation as HeartGreens at the time of our research.

We’ve reviewed several of these products ourselves, including Aloha Green Juice, Organifi, Athletic Greens, ProGreens Plus, and Living Green SupremeFood. Taking a trip to any local retailer with a supplements section will likely yield at least a couple results as well, which could be priced anywhere between $15 and $50+.

In addition, some other standalone ingredients have been clinically shown to boost nitric oxide production, such as arginine and citrulline.

Given all these options and price points, how can you choose the right one?

Based on our experience reviewing hundreds of popular dietary supplements, you’ll primarily want to focus on a manufacturer with a solid customer reputation. Questions to ask:

  • After reading through consumer review websites, do you find any common complaints?
  • If so, is the company quick to respond with a potential resolution?
  • Do they feature a competitive price and refund policy?
  • Do they provide any clinical evidence to support their claims?

Taking all of this together, what might we conclude about HeartGreens?

Our Final Thoughts About HeartGreens

There’s little doubt that reducing meat consumption and increasing vegetable consumption can positively impact heart health, largely because of reduced nitrite consumption. So, if you’re simply looking to get your daily fill (and then some) of vegetables, without a lot of fuss, HeartGreens certainly seems like it might deliver what you need.

However, by itself, based on what we learned from their summarizations of the clinical evidence, sites like the Natural Medicines Database and WebMD indicated that unless you’re deficient, the specific nutrients found in HeartGreens might not provide many real-world benefits.

Sure, the barley in the powdered supplement may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and the inulin may reduce triglycerides and relieve constipation, but at more than $1.65 per serving for the single bottle option, only you can decide if it will deliver value based on the price you pay.

If it doesn’t, Human Power of N provides a 90-day satisfaction guarantee on all HeartGreens purchases. Just remember that you’ll have to pay to ship your bottle(s) back to the company.

At just 18 calories, no fat or cholesterol, and very little sodium or carbohydrates, HeartGreens certainly doesn’t appear to be an unhealthy drink (we didn’t test it ourselves). Although unsurprisingly, as a vegetable-based drink, it doesn’t appear to contain much protein.

Vitamins A and C, calcium, and folate are essential for our health, although we’ve learned—based on our research and speaking with professionals—that they don’t provide a lot of meaningful benefits unless you’re deficient. Which most people aren’t, since much of the food supply is fortified with vitamins.

What about the specific vegetables found in each scoop of HeartGreens?

According to authoritative sites like the Natural Medicines Database and WebMD, barley has some evidence indicating it may help lower cholesterol between 14 and 20 percent, as well as blood pressure. Inulin may also help reduce triglycerides (which can clog arteries) and relieve constipation.

Outside of this, these sites didn’t report substantial evidence to support other health benefits as promoted by the manufacturer.

Could HeartGreens Cause Any Side Effects?

According to the Cornell article above, “Eighty to 90 percent of the nitrate most people consume comes from vegetables, but this is unlikely to cause health problems because very little of the nitrate in vegetables is converted to nitrite.”

As a result, outside of potential, temporary digestive upset, these sites report you’re unlikely to experience any substantial side effects when using HeartGreens as directed.

How Much Does HeartGreens Cost?

Human Power of N has priced HeartGreens as follows:

  • 1 Bottle (30 servings): $49.95 (save $5 with Replenishment Program)
  • 3 Bottles: $99.90 (save $10 with Replenishment Program)
  • 6 Bottles: $189.81

The single bottle option will come with an additional $8.95 S&H, while the other two options include free shipping.

If you choose the Replenishment option, you’ll be shipped a new supply of HeartGreens once every 30 or 90 days, and your credit card on file will be charged accordingly.

All purchases come with a 90-day refund policy, less S&H. In order to request one, or to make changes to your Replenishment Program subscription, customer service can be reached at 855-636-4040.

Are There Online Customer Reviews For HeartGreens?

We only encountered three online customer reviews for HeartGreens, all of which were on Amazon, where the supplement had an average rating of 3.5 stars. Two reviewers complimented its taste and ease of use, while the third complained of heartburn.

From a company perspective, Human Power of N is based out of Austin, TX and manufactures several other nitric oxide-focused powdered supplements like SuperBeets, Neo40, and BeetElite.

Of these, SuperBeets had the most HighYa reader reviews, with an average rating of four stars, based on 19 customer reviews. Most complimented its health benefits (everything from angina to blood pressure).

Obviously, we only include this information to help provide a clearer overall picture of the situation, not to insinuate you'll experience any of the same with HeartGreens, or any of the company’s other products.

Will you find similarly positive feedback for the competition?

Is HeartGreens the First & Only Greens Product Focused on Healthy Blood Pressure?

Far from it. In fact, searching online for “green powder” or “vegetable powder,” you’ll be met with hundreds of relevant results, many of which contain similar veggies and nutritional content as found in HeartGreens, while claiming to deliver many of the same health benefits.

However, we didn’t encounter any powdered products with the exact same formulation as HeartGreens at the time of our research.

We’ve reviewed several of these products ourselves, including Aloha Green Juice, Organifi, Athletic Greens, ProGreens Plus, and Living Green SupremeFood. Taking a trip to any local retailer with a supplements section will likely yield at least a couple results as well, which could be priced anywhere between $15 and $50+.

In addition, some other standalone ingredients have been clinically shown to boost nitric oxide production, such as arginine and citrulline.

Given all these options and price points, how can you choose the right one?

Based on our experience reviewing hundreds of popular dietary supplements, you’ll primarily want to focus on a manufacturer with a solid customer reputation. Questions to ask:

  • After reading through consumer review websites, do you find any common complaints?
  • If so, is the company quick to respond with a potential resolution?
  • Do they feature a competitive price and refund policy?
  • Do they provide any clinical evidence to support their claims?

Taking all of this together, what might we conclude about HeartGreens?

Our Final Thoughts About HeartGreens

There’s little doubt that reducing meat consumption and increasing vegetable consumption can positively impact heart health, largely because of reduced nitrite consumption. So, if you’re simply looking to get your daily fill (and then some) of vegetables, without a lot of fuss, HeartGreens certainly seems like it might deliver what you need.

However, by itself, based on what we learned from their summarizations of the clinical evidence, sites like the Natural Medicines Database and WebMD indicated that unless you’re deficient, the specific nutrients found in HeartGreens might not provide many real-world benefits.

Sure, the barley in the powdered supplement may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and the inulin may reduce triglycerides and relieve constipation, but at more than $1.65 per serving for the single bottle option, only you can decide if it will deliver value based on the price you pay.

If it doesn’t, Human Power of N provides a 90-day satisfaction guarantee on all HeartGreens purchases. Just remember that you’ll have to pay to ship your bottle(s) back to the company.

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