About Memory Healer

Created by Alexander Lynch, Memory Healer is claimed to be an easy-to-follow guide that can help you rapidly and permanently cure Alzheimer’s, dementia, and any other memory loss disease or condition, using 4 different lists of 100% natural foods, drinks, nutrients, oils, and more.

According to the product’s promotional video, these foods are available at your local grocery store and cost just a few dollars, and when taken at the right times and in the right combination, can completely, naturally, and permanently, reverse even the most severe cases of Alzheimer’s.

Because of this, Alexander claims that Memory Healer has been used by more than 43,000 Americans to date.

But is this actually the case? In other words, regardless of how many people may (or may not) have used it, can you realistically expect the information contained in the Memory Healer program to reverse almost any age-related memory problem? We’ll get to that in a moment, but let’s first take a closer look at how Memory Healer is claimed to work.

How Is Memory Healer Claimed to Work?

According to Alexander, the Memory Healer program is based on breakthrough research conducted by a team of scientists at Yale University, who found that a compound named TC-2153 could possibly cure Alzheimer’s by preventing STEP (Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphate) from destroying existing memories and inhibiting new ones from taking root. This research is claimed to have been published in a paper titled “TC-2153 Successfully Cure Alzheimer’s in Mice.”

Alexander tells us that he decided to enlist the help of a chemist in order to produce TC-2153, but quickly found out how prohibitively expensive it would be. Fortunately, he and his chemist colleague claim they found three of the same elements contained in TC-2153 but in natural foods, such as:

  • Tifluoromethyl from certain fruit juices and nectars
  • Benzyl alcohol found in fruits, teas, essential oils, and some flowers
  • Aminehydrochloride found in certain types of salt

Then, Alexander claims they added a “simple nutrient found in a select group of fruits, vegetables, beets, and lettuces,” to round out the ingredients, to “trigger a catalyst,” and to mimic the effects of TC-2153.

Let’s take a look at how well these claims hold up to scrutiny.

What is Striatal-Enriched Tyrosine Phosphate (STEP)?

According to BrightFocus.org, “STEP is a brain-specific protein that regulates the activity of several proteins required for the stabilization of memories. One of these proteins is the NMDA glutamate receptor. This receptor complex normally moves from intracellular pools to the neuronal surface where it can receive neurotransmitter signals required for the formation of long-term memories. The trafficking to and from membranes is a tightly regulated process, and STEP participates in this process.”

The Science Behind Memory Healer

The TC-2153 study referenced in the Memory Healer’s promotional video can be found here, although it’s fairly technical. However, an August 2014 Newsweek article summed up the findings nicely by stating, “a single dose of the compound TC-2153 was enough to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. Several cognitive exercises were used in the study to gauge the animals' ability to learn and remember various motor skills, spatial information, warning signals, and previously seen objects.”

However, the article ends by noting, “much more testing is still required before we can start manufacturing drugs with the TC-2153 compound. Adding a “cautionary note,” Lombroso says, “Many drugs have been successful in the mouse and failed in the humans.” His team is currently trying to replicate the results with other animals, including rats and nonhuman primates.”

With this said, since this research is in its infancy, there remains much to be learned about STEP’s role in Alzheimer’s, and there is no third-party confirmation (outside of sites directly related to Memory Healer) that eating certain foods can inhibit STEP or mimic the effects of TC-2153 in any way.

Recycled Storylines

In addition to lack of evidence, the story that “Alexander Lynch” tells us is nearly identical to other Clickbank-based products we’ve reviewed, including Navajo Restore My Hearing System, Reverse My Tinnitus, Diabetes Free, and more.

This includes claims that:

  • A loved one was affected by a disease.
  • This individual, who had no formal training or expertise, decided to do a lot of online research.
  • This individual came across some “little known” breakthrough research that was being suppressed by one industry or another.
  • This individual was able to recreate the results of the research using only simple ingredients that can be found for a few dollars at your local grocery store.
  • Because of pending lawsuits (or worse), they don’t know how long the website will be up.

In the end, this leads us to believe that very little (if any) of the story behind Memory Healer is based in reality, and is simply intended to trigger an emotional response, instead of an informed one.

More on Recycled Storylines: Long Form Sales Videos: What They Are, Why You Should Be Wary, & How To Cut Through the Hype

Are Customers Curing Alzheimer’s with Memory Healer?

Like nearly all Clickbank products (we’ll talk more about this next), Memory Healer is sold exclusively through a network of independent affiliates who earn a commission off of each sale of the program they refer. Because of this, these affiliates will often create fake customer review websites just to create more buzz on the product which essentially increases sales for them.

Outside of these, the only legitimate mention of Memory Healer we found during our research was from forum users on AboveTopSecret.com, who noted that the back-story for Memory Healer doesn’t sound credible.

Memory Healer Pricing & Refund Policy

Memory Healer is priced at $39.95 and is available for immediate download after your order is processed. With your purchase, Alexander claims you’ll also gain immediate access to the “members only” website.

Like all Clickbank products (an online ordering platform), Memory Healer comes with a 60-day refund policy. In order to request a refund, you’ll need to contact customer service at 800-390-6035.

Will Memory Healer Heal Your Memory?

Chopping to the point: Like so many of these other “cure all” Clickbank products, Memory Healer simply takes a small grain of truth (in this instance, the Yale research related to STEP inhibition), and then extrapolates it far beyond its intended boundaries. In other words, these authors make you think they’re trustworthy because they include “science” in their presentation, but quickly move into the realm of snake oil salesmen.

Considering this, it’s our opinion that Memory Healer is a scam, and would provide you with a low level of value for your money at any price.

Want to Learn to Shop Smarter and Scam-Proof Your Life?

Join over 2 million HighYa readers who receive weekly how-to guides, tips & reviews and get a FREE COPY of our 145 Scam Hacks e-book. Enter your email below to get started!

2 Customer Reviews for Memory Healer

Average Customer Rating: 2.0
Rating Snapshot:
5 stars: 0 4 stars: 0 3 stars: 1 2 stars: 0 1 stars: 1
Bottom Line: 0% would recommend it to a friend
Showing 1-2 of 2
Sort reviews by:

  • 21 out 24 people found this review helpful

    Buyer Beware, this doesn't work!

    • Georgia,
    • Nov 5, 2015

    This 21 day program does not work. I contact this company about a refund within the 60 days did not receive one. They removed the eBook and kept my money. Buyer beware, you will lose both ways.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (0)
    View all 0 commentsHide comments

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)

  • 18 out 23 people found this review helpful

    Memory Healer

    • Fond du LAc WI,
    • Oct 10, 2015

    I just ordered it and I think it was a mistake. I thought I was buying a book. It shows pictures of a book. I don't know how to upload or download. I don't even have a printer. I'm almost 80 years old and I want to cancel this order if it's not a "book". If this is a REAL book, I apologize and anxiously await it's arrival.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

    Help others find the most helpful reviews

    Was this review helpful?

    yes no
    Comments (2)
    View all 2 commentsHide comments
    • Oct 31, 2015

      Judy Adams

      I also had trouble, as I thought the book was coming in the mail. There is a link to download to your computer but 99 pages of text is a lot to print out. I have printed it out for easy reading and willing to mail a copy to you. I did implement the food combing, and it either works or I am the miracle worker. I am happy with the program and the juice I am making which has been the most effective rather than solid food combing. Judy Adams 612-227-6965

    • May 15, 2016

      J. Waters


      I regret to inform you that this is nothing but a plain old scam. Having reviewed in detail all of the evidence in question, the drug used in the Yale study has no resemblance at all to the ingredients mentioned.

      I suspect the above poster is a salesperson trying to prevent you from demanding a refund for this borderline fraud. Every claim, no matter minor, from that video was either entirely fabricated or presented in a misleading or false manner. This includes the testimonials.

      The fact is that thousands of caring, brilliant scientists with relatives of their own affected by neurodegenerative diseases are hard at work on a cure. If there was a cure this simple every doctor in America would know about it. While pharmaceutical companies may have unscrupulous practices when it comes to pricing, basic drug discovery is not governed by profits. It's being handled by qualified and devoted people.

      Please demand your money back, file a complaint with the better business bureau, and speak with a class action attorney. These lowlifes are preying on vulnerable and desperate human beings, and should all be behind bars. It may just be 40 bucks, but it's knowingly giving people false hope.

    Do you have an account? Log In before commenting.

    (If you don’t have an account – don’t worry, you can create it after)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Write a review for Memory Healer!

Share your experience to help others avoid scams & discover great products!

Write a Review