About NooCube

Designed by top neuroscientists, the NooCube nootropic promises to deliver a synergistic blend of vitamins, amino acids, and other ingredients to help improve cognitive function, enhance focus, boost mental speed and memory, and provide faster reactions. How does it do this?

The manufacturer claims that NooCube’s ingredients are clinically proven help support healthy, well-functioning neurotransmitters, which, in turn, will “shift your brain into a higher gear.” All you need to do is take two capsules with breakfast each morning and you’ll begin experiencing results as little as 30-45 minutes, which will last 8-10 hours. Without side effects—or caffeine!

Whether you’re looking to get a leg up on the competition, or just take your abilities to new heights, a lot of us could potentially benefit from supplements like NooCube. Is there anything to them, or are you paying a lot, only to get very little in return?

Let’s begin by taking a look at what nootropics are and how they’re (supposed to) work.

What Are Nootropics? How Do They Improve Brain Function?

As mentioned on the NooCube website, nootropics are specific chemicals that are thought to enhance brain function in some way, usually related to memory (the way our brain stores information) and cognition (the way our brain processes information).

One of the ways that most nootropics—NooCube included—claim to do this is by boosting the levels of acetylcholine in the brain. This neurotransmitter works in both the sympathetic (“fight or flight”) and parasympathetic (“rest and digest”) nervous systems to regulate motor (e.g. muscle) and memory functions.

The problem is that boosting acetylcholine isn’t as easy as it sounds, since there are no food sources that contain the neurotransmitter and no supplements containing acetylcholine. What about NooCube’s ingredients, though?

Will NooCube’s Ingredients Boost Acetylcholine?

Here’s what we’re told is contained in NooCube:

Of these, huperzine a may be effective for improving some aspects of memory in dementia patients and healthy individuals alike. Similarly, bacopa might help improve memory, although research has only been conducted on two specific bacopa supplements; KeenMind and BacoMind.

Tyrosine may be effective for improving some aspects of mental performance, memory, and alertness, although most of the existing research involved testing under specific stressful conditions (such as military training).

Outside of this, there seems to be limited clinical evidence that any of NooCube’s other ingredients will provide the benefits claimed by the manufacturer. Even among the ingredients that have some clinical support, we’re not told how much NooCube contains, or whether or not this would be enough to provide any benefits.

What about possible NooCube side effects?

Does NooCube Cause Any Side Effects?

While some of the clinical support for NooCube’s ingredients might be fuzzy (more about this next), the good news is if you experience anything negative, it probably won’t be worse than mild digestive upset.

In less frequent instances, huperzine a might cause “blurred vision, slurred speech, restlessness, loss of appetite, contraction and twitching of muscle fibers,” and more. Cat claw “can cause headache, dizziness, and vomiting in some people.”

The scientific community doesn’t know enough about l-theanine to say whether or not it’s safe for use longer than 3 weeks at a time. Tyrosine, however, seems to be safe when used in doses up to 150 mg/kg per day for up to 3 months—but again, we don’t know how much of each ingredient NooCube contains!

What About All That Clinical Evidence for NooCube?

Admittedly, compared to the dozens of other brain-boosting supplements we’ve reviewed here at HighYa (more about this in a second), NooCube’s manufacturer included many more clinical references than most to support their claims.

However, after browsing through the details of many of these references, we learned some interesting things. Here are a few of the more noteworthy ones, as well as our thoughts:

  • This paper written by Dr. Parris M. Kidd, the Chief Scientific Officer for Doctor’s Best Inc., a supplements manufacturer. We’re not necessarily implying anything, but we’ve learned that consumers might want to take research funded directly by supplements companies with a grain of salt (it’s only a paper anyway; not formal research).
  • The Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) application for a proprietary ingredient named AlphaSize A-GPC, submitted by a company name Life Sciences Organization. This only referenced other previous studies, most of which were conducted on mice.
  • A 2008 study involving only 35 participants (a very small sample size), who drank Xerocomus badius mushroom tea. They study found that alpha waves and brain activity increased, although they didn’t study what benefits this increased activity provided in the real world.

What’s the point? For these ingredients (as well as some of the other ones we talked about above), just because there might be a handful of “clinical” studies, this certainly doesn’t mean that they’re “proven” to work like NooCube’s manufacturer claims.

How Much Does NooCube Cost?

NooCube is available in the following quantities:

  • 1 Bottle (60 capsules): $43.23
  • 3 Bottles: $86.47
  • 6 Bottles: $129.70

All NooCube purchases come with a 60-day money back guarantee—including S&H! However, based on their Terms, this only appears to be eligible for unused bottles. In order to request one, you’ll need to contact customer service at (646) 568-9679 or cs@noocube.com.

Is NooCube the Only Game In Town?

As we alluded to earlier, we’ve reviewed a lot of these nootropics, including popular options like Geniux, Brain Storm Elite, Neuroflexyn, and many more.

While there weren’t any online reviews for NooCube at the time of our research, most of these types of supplements (and supplements in general) come with low feedback from customers; typically 2 stars or less. The most common complaint is that they don’t work, with ultra-high prices and ultra-poor customer service following close behind.

Important note: We’re not necessarily saying you’ll experience the same with NooCube. However, we think you should keep it at the top of your mind before placing your order.

Let’s carry this thought over to the following section as we wrap things up.

Is NooCube Worth a Try?

The goal of each HighYa review is to give you the information you need, so that you can make up your own mind. In other words, we’re not here to tell you what to do for any product or service.

With this in mind, we’ve got to hand it to NooCube: they listed more studies than most supplements manufacturers, and they claim to provide a truly no-risk purchase with refunds that include S&H charges.

However, the clinical evidence for most of the supplement’s ingredients is weak—and even for those supplements that might be effective, it’s far from clinically “proven” that most of us will experience the same.

As if this wasn’t enough, we don’t know how much of each ingredient NooCube contains, and it comes to us from an almost wholly completely unknown company (ERGO Group Limited based out of Dubai, UAE, although their phone number is based out of NYC).

Based on all of this, we think there are a lot better ways of boosting your memory instead of purchasing NooCube, including getting a better night’s sleep, reducing sugar consumption, and decreasing stress.

Did you already buy a bottle of NooCube? If so, tell us all about your experience by writing a review below!

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