About Ultherapy

Founded in 2004 and based out of Mesa, AZ, Ultherapy is a non-invasive aesthetic facelift procedure that uses ultrasound energy to “lift, tone, and tighten loose skin on the brow, neck, and under the chin.” According to the company, the technology for Ultherapy was initially developed through a research partnership in 1998, which was intended to treat liver cancer. After witnessing the aesthetic possibilities of this new technology, Ultherapy was later formed, and received FDA approval in 2009. The company claims that the technology was so groundbreaking that the FDA had to designate Ultherapy as a “new category of non-invasive technology.”

Ultherapy has more than 35,000 Facebook likes, 1,500 Twitter followers, and even their own YouTube channel. Ultherapy’s parent company Ulthera has an A- rating with the Better Business Bureau, which encompasses just one complaint in three years. From a customer satisfaction standpoint, online reviews seem to be mixed, with many patients claiming their Ultherapy results were mediocre, and the procedure was more painful than expected.

How Ultherapy Works

According to the company’s website, “Ultherapy delivers micro-focused ultrasound energy below the skin’s surface,” which heats tissue and results in a tightening and lifting effect. Ultherapy claims that its proprietary technology allows foundational layers of your skin to be reached that were previously only accessible through traditional surgical facelifts.

The Ultherapy system is a self-contained, transportable unit that is comprised of four main components:

  • The System Control Unit: Known as the “heart” of the Ultherapy system, the control unit features a 27” touchscreen display, which allows clinicians to view minute details of the patient’s tissue planes.
  • The Handpiece: The system’s handpiece is what houses the transducers (see below), and can be used at “multiple angles and hand positions.”
  • Transducers: Ultherapy’s transducers are what actually deliver the ultrasound energy to the patient’s skin, and can be used at three different depths¾4.5mm, 3mm, and 1.5mm¾depending on the patient’s needs.
  • The Cart: Ultherapy’s cart is what gives the system its mobility, and includes handpiece holsters and a customized storage system.

When using the Ultherapy system, there are four primary areas that can be treated: Full face, brow, lower face, and neck. The company claims that the ultrasound energy delivered during each 60-90 minute session helps boost collagen production, and to produce a lifting effect.

The company claims that there is no downtime after undergoing a procedure, and that much of your results will be visible within 2-3 months, with continuous improvement over the course of six months. However, most Ultherapy patients report redness and swelling, general discomfort, numbness, and bruising afterward, with a downtime of 2-3 days.

Because Ultherapy is a medical device, only licensed physicians are permitted to purchase and use it. For a full list of doctors in your area who offer Ultherapy, please visit their Find a Doctor page.

Ultherapy Pricing

Because the Ultherapy system must be purchased by a physician’s practice and can be used in a variety of treatments, overall price can vary depending on a number of factors. However, average cost ranges between $3,000 and $5,000, with most individuals requiring three treatments, and follow-up sessions every 12 months.

Pros

  • Non-invasive technique that lifts and tightens skin on the face, neck, and chin.
  • Little to no downtime.
  • Backed by two large venture capital firms.

Cons

  • Some complaints that the procedure is much more painful than expected.
  • Some patients have experienced severe reactions, including nerve damage.'On average, most clients seem to experience relatively mediocre results.

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3 Customer Reviews for Ultherapy

Average Customer Rating: 1.0
Rating Snapshot:
5 stars: 0 4 stars: 0 3 stars: 0 2 stars: 0 1 stars: 3
Bottom Line: 0% would recommend it to a friend
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  • Ultherapy Ruined My Face and Life.

    Ultherapy ruined my face: mass fat loss, significant vision loss, sunken eyes, tight eyelids, dry eye, lacrimal tear, muscle atrophy, jaw and cheek bone loss, ringing in ears.

    The doctor used 900 lines on me, full face and I was 'possibly' a candidate for 200 lines, if at all, as I am very slender, small boned with minimal facial fat, it was overdose. It burned all my underlying tissues. I will never be the same. I look 20 years older then I am, a skeleton.

    Ladies, please beware, this device is not FDA cleared for the face, Ulthera, Inc is scamming the cosmetic industry. It burns the face.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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  • 5 out 5 people found this review helpful

    Ultherapy made me ugly

    • Los Angeles, CA,
    • Oct 6, 2015

    This has been a horror movie. I lost all the fat and my face tightened so much that at month 5 my eyes shrank. They were gorgeous. This went on for 6 months. Now I have nerve damage on my head, an ugly face with small eyes, and I may be having vision issues. This is literally THE biggest regret of my life. Beauty to Beast! Plus the company lies and won't report bad reviews. Disgraceful.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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  • 5 out 6 people found this review helpful

    Business owners beware before you buy Ultherapy machine

    • Los Angeles, CA,
    • Jul 7, 2015

    This is for any business owner, physician, or Nurse practitioner planning on buying the Ultherapy machine for their practice. This company will sell you the unit, give you a one day training, even though they tell you before you buy the machine, that you will be getting 2 full days training session! THEN, they just forget about you.

    Another very important thing they leave out when selling you the machine is that if for any reason, you decide to sell the machine later, or sell your practice to anyone else, the new practitioner will have to pay them a whopping $30,000 "certification fee", or they will not sell them the transducers!

    So, before you buy this machine, Think long and hard, if you want to risk blowing over $100,000 into this thing, and god forbid you have to sell it or your practice later, for ANY reason, no one will want the damn machine!!!! Consider yourselves warned.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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