About Work at Home EDU

If you recently visited the Work at Home Edu website, you’re probably wondering if it really is a fast, easy, and proven formula that’s guaranteed to help you earn a sizeable income from home. What’s more, you’re also wondering if you can realistically accomplish this by working as little or as much as you want.

With these questions in mind, we peered beneath the surface of Work at Home Edu, and here’s what we uncovered.

Work at Home Edu Background

Work at Home Edu’s homepage is fairly vague, other than claiming to help you earn money from home without requiring any prior experience, that you can work from anywhere, that you can choose your hours, and that you must have an internet connection.

As such, if you’re curious to learn more and decide to enter your name, zip code, and email address, you’ll then be taken to a page that “verifies” the availability of positions in your area. At the top of this page, a banner will appear that reads, “Congratulations! There are currently 3 positions left in your city.” However, despite the fact that these positions are claimed to be filling up quickly, we tried several different zip codes and found the same number available each time.

Glaring mistakes aside, Work at Home Edu is claimed to be the brainchild of someone name Michelle Robinson, who bills herself as “the number 1 home job consultant in America.” Michelle claims that she used to work a typical 9-5 job until being laid off, after which she scrambled to find something that would cover the bills and help support her daughter. After realizing she wanted something that would give her the freedom to spend time with her daughter while also earning a solid income, she met a man who coached her on how to accomplish just this. And after only a few months of applying this man’s techniques, she was able to pay off most of her bills, and after only 5 years in business she claims to now earn millions per year.

How Work at Home Edu Works

At its most basic, Work at Home Edu claims to be an ethical way of earning money from companies who are “desperate” to find people who can post links for them, but who don’t want to hire full time employees to do it. On top of this, the Work at Home Edu program is claimed to be useful for individuals of any age and background, and that the process can be performed anywhere and at any time. In fact, the website claims that once you sign up for their program, it’s up to you how much you want to make.

With this in mind, Work at Home Edu claims that they’ve whittled the link-posting process down to 3 easy steps:

  1. Log into your account and copy the link code provided by the system.
  2. Access a list of customers who need their links posted. New customers are claimed to be constantly added so that you’ll always have work available.
  3. Fill out a “few simple details” and submit the link. Then, click on the earnings section of the website to see how much money you’re making each hour, day, and week.

Work at Home Edu Pricing & Refund Policy

The Work at Home Edu program is priced at $97.

For this price, you’ll gain access to the Work at Home Edu training center, which is claimed to contain over 100 hours of material that can help you succeed, as well as to the Startup Freedom Club, although no additional information is provided as to exactly what this club is, or what benefits it provides. After signing up, you’ll also receive a free one-on-one phone consultation with a Success Advisor in order to help you achieve financial success.

After paying the one-time fee, Work at Home Edu also claims to provide you with a list of companies that pay the most money for link posting, and that 75% of these companies pay you on a weekly basis.

Work at Home Edu claims to come with a 2-month satisfaction guarantee, which provides a 100% refund if you’re not fully satisfied. In order to begin the refund process, you’ll need to contact customer service at 888-321-3834.

Important note: Work at Home Edu’s Contact page also shows a customer service number of 877-915-5908, which we’ll talk more about in the Bottom Line section.

What’s the Bottom Line About Work at Home Edu?

With all of this information in mind, if you’re looking to earn money from home, can Work at Home Edu really provide you with a tangible opportunity? Maybe, but there are some important things you should know beforehand.

Do You Enjoy Affiliate Marketing?

First and foremost, despite how simple and easy the Work at Home Edu website makes the process seem, what you’ll actually be doing is something closely related to affiliate marketing. In other words, you’ll place a link on a website for a specific product, and if someone clicks on one of your links and then makes a purchase, you’ll earn a commission from each sale.

Related: How to Identify Affiliate Marketing Scams

While affiliate marketing is a legitimate way to make money online, in order to get your links on websites that rank highly on search engines, you may need to spend a considerable amount of time and money, which may defeat your original intent.

Read the Fine Print

In fact, Work at Home Edu’s Disclaimed specifically states that “Whatsoever claims made of genuine profits or cases of real outcomes are not representative or typical,” and, “there's no warrantee that you'll realize any income applying the methods and thoughts in these materials.”

In other words, despite the fact that Michelle Robinson and Work at Home Edu claim these techniques are “proven” and “guaranteed,” the reality is that they’re anything but.

Who is Michelle Robinson?

With this in mind, who is Michelle Robinson anyway? Based on the text on Work at Home Edu’s main page, you might think that she’s some bigwig in the Work at Home industry—so big in fact that she hosts one-day seminars in New York City.

However, the reality is that this person simply doesn’t exist. In other words, Michelle and her rags-to-riches story (similar to Partner with Tom and other work-at-home opportunities) are completely fabricated in order to make the program seem more appealing.

Potential Money Pit

As with many of these types of work at home opportunities, the initial price is often only the beginning. In fact, we found numerous customer reviews claiming that as soon as they signed up for Work at Home Edu and handed over $97 to join, they were asked to pay for several additional services that often totaled $500 or more apiece, which usually involved setting up web pages to host their links.

As Seen On…

Outside of Michelle’s story, you might be swayed by the fact that Work at Home Edu has been seen on networks such as MSNBC, ABC, Fox News, and several others. However, after some fairly intensive research, we were unable to find any mention of the program on any of these networks.

Instead, it would seem that work at home opportunities in general—not Work at Home Edu specifically—may have been covered on some of these networks. The unfortunate reality is that this is a common tactic among less-than-stellar work at home websites, and is simply intended to mislead you.

Phone Number

Finally, don’t be swayed by Work at Home Edu’s 2-month refund policy, as we found several customers who complained that it was nearly impossible to obtain one.

Curiously, we performed a reverse lookup for the 888-321-3834 number provided on Work at Home Edu’s main page, which appears to belong to Jefferson Debt Settlement based out of Jacksonville, FL, while the 877-915-5908 number provided on the company’s Contact page also belongs to another company named Stay at Home Revenue.

Bottom line: After reading all of this information, you’ve likely already come to your own conclusion about Work at Home Edu. While there are completely legitimate ways of making money while working from home, based on the company’s almost wholly negative online reputation and shady business model, we might recommend spending your hard-earned money elsewhere.

More on Working at Home and Making Money Online:

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3 Customer Reviews for Work at Home EDU

Average Customer Rating: 1.3
Rating Snapshot:
5 stars: 0 4 stars: 0 3 stars: 0 2 stars: 1 1 stars: 2
Bottom Line: 0% would recommend it to a friend
Showing 1-3 of 3
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  • 27 out 27 people found this review helpful

    This Work at Home EDU is nothing but a FRAUD

    • New York,
    • May 16, 2016

    First, I have to admit that I was so stupid to even try this stuff.

    I have a part-time job, and as you can imagine, I have plenty time doing nothing at home, so I found a link on the internet that claim you can make money from home. I thought that's a great idea since my rent is so expensive (I live in NY) why not work at home?

    The website contains all kinds of positive comments, and of course, I got skeptical, I searched for it, but didn't find any negative comments (Why I didn't saw this article by then?). They started with a long lasting video, and made everything sounds easy and great. The what so ever $97 sounds like a small cost compared to what they say you will make after EDU program. To be honest, I was skeptical all along the process, but I still wanted to give it a try, so I paid, and got the program.

    Once you enter the program, they want you to call the number 855-787-8590, which I didn't call in the first place (I will mention this later) because it was off business time. Then I started to go through the startup videos they provide on the page. The first two are like brainwashing videos which I skipped. Then there are a couple of videos that DID give you an idea of the cost per acquisition, and how it works. BUT, the way they described the cost per acquisition is relatively vague, it seemed like they get to the point, but if you really give it an ounce of thought, you would realized you still can't operate anything. They don't really show you much. And anything that get to the critical point, they want you to spend extra money to either buy a website, domain, program, etc.

    After two days buying the program, I got a call from 855-787-8590 which I mentioned above. It was a guy, who I feel sounded exactly the same as the guy talking in those videos. He claimed he is calling to tutor me, help me start my business. But the weird thing happen...... he ask me a couple of personal questions, for example, what is your job? how old are you? what is your credit score look like? do you have a credit card? how do you support yourself? how much can you afford to develop your business.... etc. I answered patiently, but some of my answer wasn't true, like I said my parents support me, and I only have $3000 to invest in business.

    Then he start to be weird, he said, “depends on your ability to invest, I have some advanced program you can take to really work-at-home. There are two programs, one is $2000 for two weeks training, one is $2400 for 4 weeks.”

    AT THIS POINT, I am so sure this is a spam. I replied, “I don't want to spend that much on the program, I think I will keep the way I am doing.”

    Then he threatened me and said, “You don't know what you're are doing, you can not make any money if you don't take the advanced class.” THIS literally proves that all the $97 is a joke! He admitted that you can't make any thing out of it, you can't learn anything from it.

    Then I got upset, I said, “Is this a spam? why I should take the extra program? this is not what you said in the intro.” Then he started to insult me and he said, “Well if you don't want to spent the money to invest yourself, I guess you just go home and cry to mommy and daddy for money to make a living.” Remember the wrong answer I provided him in the very beginning, he used that to insult me, what a joke and jerk.

    Then I said I don't want to waste my time talking to spam, I hung up.

    PEOPLE who are considering buying the joke Work at Home EDU, do not do it! You can absolutely go as far without the tutor video simply by searching on the internet, there are plenty of free materials.

    After that phone call, I was thinking why even bother to deal with it. But now I read this article, I feel like I have the obligation to unveil the fraud and save more people's innocent money. Save that money for yourself, don't flourish them.

    At the end, I don't even want to give one star, but you know, it is the minimum required star.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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  • 68 out 69 people found this review helpful

    How could I be so stupid?

    • Ivey, GA,
    • Jul 15, 2015

    Wanting to change jobs, I found this link on one of the websites I'd linked with to find work. As stated in this article above, this link claimed to have been discussed on five major news programs. At the time, September 2014, I could not find any spam notices on this link, so I signed up. I went through the online tutorials and called the number provided to get started. The 'mentors' I spoke with would not walk me through what I had signed up for, all they wanted was to convince me to use a credit card to earn more money. Seriously, now that I did not fall for. I told them all I wanted was to get started with posting links and see how that went.

    Unfortunately, during this time I lost my mother, so you can imagine how disoriented I was for several weeks. By the time I got things sorted out, I could no longer access the site and couldn't find any numbers to contact them or emails. Earlier this week I found the pages I had printed out when supposedly researching this site. There was a number but they cannot assist me in a refund. I was told to look at my statement and contact the number provided there. I did that, the number provided is followed by UT. There is no account number. The number is also bogus, they claim to have changed the number and that number is bogus.

    Well, I'm out $97.00, which I could not afford to be out of and these people do not exist. I called the number on the original papers and Mary Carr, whom I had spoken to earlier this week, said they are not associated with Foundation of E Commerce and all she could tell me was to contact the number on my statement.

    I have been leary of 'at-home-jobs' for some years but being as I could not find any alerts on this company, I thought I'd try it. This Michelle Robinson also says in the intro that she will provide her personal email once signed up. That didn't happen either.

    People say there are plenty of jobs out there that can be done from home but I have yet to find one that doesn't want money to put you to work. I'm done with these bogus offers. Also, how can these people post these links are Employment sites that are supposed to nationwide and legitimate? That gives me pause to even trust them anymore.

    Seems everything is done on-line these days and even then you find trouble behind most every door.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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    • Apr 3, 2015

      Ali

      Thank you very much for telling your story.

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  • 44 out 44 people found this review helpful

    Desperation breeds stupidity, but at least I got my refund

    Caveat emptor! You will get an education at this site, but the lesson you will learn is NOT about how to make money online. Those who fall prey to these "get rich quick" schemes will discover they inevitably fall short of the claims.

    My story is common. I was compelled to resign my job by a fascist boss who cut my hours drastically, and being 56 years old, I doubted I could overcome the rampant age discrimination in my field of work. Still, I actually read through the terms and conditions before getting out the credit card (having been scammed before with Tellman's and Joe Vitale's BS), and the bits about WAHEDU not being a "business offer" should have clued me in. I figured with two months to get a refund, perhaps I could glean some training that might give me a leg up on making money online, and that I could quit before the deadline.

    What was so ironic was that the videos (really podcasts with a few graphics here and there) didn't even stream properly (to be fair, that might be a problem on my end, however). I complained about this and demanded a refund. I was stalled for three requests, and then they finally forked over the dough. I continued to use the site for free just to get back at them for scamming me until I figured I was wasting my time; their content is just the pits.

    I decided to give WAHEDU two stars instead of one just because they DID give me a refund, and the support team was much better than I have ever experienced with Joe Vitale or Tellman's products. However all you have to do is compare and contrast what's available on other sites to see that my assessment, however scanty on research, is accurate.

    For example, check out clickbank.com's start up videos, or Pat Flynn's blog smartpassiveincome.com. Their content is infinitely better, a much higher production value, and the content is realistic and transparent.

    To build a platform, research and attract a niche audience and get an email list up takes time and dedicated consistency (and money). You have to do a LOT of market research, a lot of work blogging, and provide killer content on a daily basis before you can start making money doing referrals or recommending links to products your audience will actually start clicking on. I can't fathom how churning out links to classified sites as WAHEDU recommends will bring in any serious money, and I find it especially hard to believe the testimonial videos they have up on the site.

    I am actually relieved to know the truth now, and that at least I didn't lose any money. Now I just have to start worrying about being able to find another source of income -- fast.

    Bottom Line: No, I would not recommend this to a friend

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